The trees of France

The other day on the way back from Parthenay, I took some reference photos of trees while we were driving. Many of these are somewhat blurry or washed out, but I decided not to try to clean them up. Trees are always in motion anyway. Trees are a theme lately, from the Domythic Bliss post on Windling Trees that shows the trees Terri Windling painted in her old Devon home and Endicott West, to Terri’s own recent images of the trees of Riverside Drive in New York. These kinds of posts were my succor when I had no trees of my own. Now that I do, it’s only right that I share them.

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This one below is one of my favorites:

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Below you can see a common sight, a tree trimmed around the wiring rather than cut down to make room for it:

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And here is another common sight, trees loaded with mistletoe:

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Here we are driving through the Forest of Secondigny that lies between us and Parthenay:

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  • http://mythistoria.blogspot.com cinnabari

    I love those massive deciduous trees. Before SoCal, I spent most of my formative years with evergreen, alpine forests (now… palm trees. I have not learned to love them. The eucalyptus, at least, smell fantastic). Those trees, your trees, seem strange and magical to me.

  • http://www.erzaveria.com Erzebet

    I’m sure palm trees have their own beauty, but yes, I love the great sweeping branches and leaves of old maples and oaks. These trees here, the big ones with their spindly winter arms, are my favorite but I can’t for the life of me remember what they are called. :)